Education & Training

Crime Scene to Courtroom Forensics: Train the Trainer Live Seminar

Capital Litigation Initiative

Austin, Texas
August 6 & 7, 2018

The National Clearinghouse for Science, Technology and Law (NCSTL) at Stetson University College of Law welcomes you to Crime Scene to Courtroom Forensics: Train the Trainer a two-day live seminar in Austin, Texas.

This two-day seminar is designed to teach seasoned prosecutors and defense attorneys how to conduct their own trainings on proper forensic evidence use in capital litigation. Following the seminar, you will be able to teach attorney teams at your office about forensic evidence principles and challenges that most frequently arise in criminal cases.

Topics include:

  • Overview of established curriculum for live training: courses, webinars, and e-resource toolkits
  • Forensic science resources: caselaw, literature, and web-based information
  • Evidentiary requirements for admissibility of scientific evidence: Daubert, Frye, Kuhmo Tire
  • Locating, selecting, and evaluating expert witnesses
  • Training tips and techniques for engaging your audience
  • Applied learning: demonstrating instructor skillset

Seminar Materials


More Information

There are a limited number of slots for the training session and every effort will be made to incorporate as many states as possible, with priority given to practitioners who actively handle death penalty cases. Register for this seminar.

Funded by the U.S. Department of Justice, Capital Litigation Initiative: Crime Scene to Courtroom Forensics Training

This project was supported by Grant No. 2015-CP-BX-K006 awarded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance. The Bureau of Justice Assistance is a component of the Department of Justice's Office of Justice Programs, which also includes the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the Office for Victims of Crime, and the SMART Office. Points of view or opinions in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.